"NOTHING IS PERMANENT ABOUT OUR BEHAVIORS EXCEPT OUR BELIEF THAT THEY ARE SO." ---  MOSHE FELDENKRAIS

"NOTHING IS PERMANENT ABOUT OUR BEHAVIORS EXCEPT OUR BELIEF THAT THEY ARE SO." ---  MOSHE FELDENKRAIS

 

My name is Taro Iwamoto.  I am a certified Feldenkrais practitioner with backgrounds in athletic training, orthopedic/neurological rehabilitation, and martial arts.  I have always been engaged in sports (rugby, boxing, kickboxing) and martial arts (karate, aikido, shaolin kempo), and I started my career as a certified athletic trainer.  I then moved to orthopedic rehabilitation settings;  I have worked as an exercise specialist at Olympic Physical Therapy in Mercer Island, WA since 2006 (until 2016).  I am a licensed physical therapist assistant (PTA), a certified athletic trainer (ATC), a certified strength and conditioning specialist (CSCS), an orthopedic movement specialist (OMS), and a certified Feldenkrais practitioner (GCFP).

Over the years, working with a wide variety of clients, my curiosity about human movement has led me to dig deep to understand how people can be taught to move with more efficiency/fluidity, more comfort, and ease.  In this quest, I have studied anatomy/physiology, biomechanics, kinesiology, evolutionary biology, child development, psychology, neuroscience, etc.  I have been studying the Feldenkrais Method®, a somatic educational method that focuses on improving human functioning by improving awareness through movement. This method is very much consistent with my philosophy in movement education.

What got me so interested in studying the Feldenkrais Method® was that the fact we develop habitual patterns of actions including: moving, sensing, thinking, and feeling, early in our life we carry those habitual patterns throughout our life.  We use our habitual patterns to respond and react to challenges/difficulties (physical, emotional, intellectual).  We struggle and suffer (physically, emotionally, and intellectually) when our habitual patterns don't get us past the challenges.  This pattern repeats itself UNLESS you learn to develop NEW patterns that allow us to move over challenges.  This made a lot of sense to me as I observed clients that returned for the same or similar issues and noticed that they were using the same movement patterns to carry out their daily tasks, which resulted in their issue(s) in the first place.  

My focus with clients now is to teach how they can move more efficiently (= new movement patterns) so they can recover from injuries, prevent injuries, and improve athletic performance.  Improving movement efficiency requires improving neuromuscular-skeletal coordination, which will lead to: decreased stress to the injured area(s); more power; improved balance.